HCCF by Zara Agnes

Nourishment From Within

HCCF provides a range of Halal Chinese Confinement Food products & services with a focus on quickening recovery during postpartum and post-surgery confinement. Read our story

To celebrate CNY this year, we thought we’d do something a little different. So on Chap Goh Mei, we sent out giant #ForTwoCookies to unsuspecting mommies with a random love message from her cheeky baby.

We had so much fun seeing who got which message.

Special thanks to our creative collaborators The Honest Treat and The Makmal for making this happen.

Thank you mommies for sharing your #ForTwoCookies moment with us. Enjoy the video below 😘😘😘

(Psst… The #ForTwoCookies is not for sale ya… But you can always get our milk boosters)

HCCF

Founder, HCCF

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Black rice—also known as forbidden rice or “emperor’s rice”—is popular for its high levels of antioxidants and superior nutritional value. Forbidden rice earned its name because it was once reserved for the Chinese emperor to ensure his health and longevity, and forbidden to anyone else. Forbidden rice is a medium-grain, non-glutinous heirloom rice with a deep purple hue and a nutty, slightly sweet flavor. This whole-grain rice is rich in anthocyanins, which are antioxidant pigments that give the rice its unusual colour. The most nutritious rice in the rice family — it’s high in fiber, antioxidants, protein, and iron. This, combined with its high level of anthocyanins, makes it a nutrition powerhouse. According to Chinese medicine, it is considered a blood tonic.

Red rice — like black rice, it’s packed with flavonoid antioxidants, including the anthocyanins apigenin, myricetin, and quercetin. In fact, research shows that red rice has significantly more potential to fight free radicals and contains higher concentrations of flavonoid antioxidants than brown rice.

With our servings of multigrain rice that consists of black, red, and brown rice, you’re sure to get the best of everything!

HCCF

Founder, HCCF

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Have you ever wondered why we can eat ginger and black pepper during confinement but advised to stay away from chilli? Aren’t they all spicy and the same? Why mummies who went through caesarean especially, can’t consume chilli?

Ginger and black pepper are known to stimulate thermogenesis which helps to improve digestion and metabolic performance, thus reducing fat accumulation in our body. It’s also a diaphoretic (promotes sweating), which means it will help your body warm from the inside out.

The stomach muscles of postpartum mums has weakened and need time for recovery. Mums who undergo caesarean surgery should be careful with their stitches by not moving too much, hence it is not advisable to eat chilli as they may cause diarrhoea or discomfort to the stomach.

HCCF

Founder, HCCF

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We get this question a lot because of different family practice or culture when it comes to confinement. Some asked if consuming chicken will make them itchy. Here’s what — everyone reacts to foods differently — so you do you, whatever you’re comfortable with, and do not let your family impose on you 🙂.

Protein makes up the building blocks of organs, muscles, skin, hormones and pretty much everything that matters in your body. It is important for postpartum recovery and for the growth and repair of your cells. If you are breastfeeding, you have to ensure a healthy daily intake of protein because your baby will need protein for cell growth and immune function.

Since protein is what makes up hair itself, you’ll also want to ensure you are eating 50 to 75 grams daily depending on whether you’re breastfeeding. And fill up on vitamin C-rich foods (bell peppers, spinach and broccoli, citrus fruits and berries), which your body uses to form collagen — the protein that makes hair strong.

Good protein sources include yogurt, milk, lean beef, chicken, fish, eggs, tofu, beans and nuts.

HCCF

Founder, HCCF

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